Frequenty Asked Questions:

*Contents
1.  What is slapt-get ?
2.  Why yet another package management tool for slackware?
3.  How do I build/install slapt-get?  How do I remove slapt-get?
4.  How do I find a package I want to install?
5.  Can I upgrade all my installed packages?
6.  How can I see what will be upgraded without upgrading?
7.  What if I only want to download the updates?
8.  How can I re-install an existing package?
9.  Can I "dist-upgrade" to a newer Slackware release?
10. What about package dependencies?
11. What about multiple package sources, ala linuxpackages.net?
12. How can I get more detailed statistics for downloads?
13. How can I install every available package?
14. What if I only want to upgrade one package?
15. What about Dropline support?
16. How can I generate an exclude list for an entire disk set?
17. How do I use a local file source?
18. How can I download every package in a disk set?
19. How can I add dependency information to my packages?
20. How do I get the newest development version of slapt-get?
21. How can I contribute my ideas or code?
22. How can I get slapt-get to speak in my native tongue?
23. How do I set the output language?
24. How do I specify proxy settings?
25. How can I exclude all *pre*, *beta*, and *686* packages safely?
26. How does the transaction engine work?
27. How does the package version comparison algorithm work?
28. I am tracking current, how do I keep the base disk set up to date?
29. How would I script an ldd dependency hack with slapt-get?
30. Does EXCLUDE work for install as well as upgrade and dist-upgrade?
31. What about package conflicts?  How can I specify a conflict for my package?
32. Is the ROOT environment variable honored for install and upgrading?
33. How do I specify the exact version of a package to install?
34. Why is upgradepkg complaining it cannot find installpkg or removepkg, with sudo?
35. How can I specify a username/password for the connection to the package source?
36. /var/slapt-get is growing large, how can I safely free up space?
37. What about extra, testing, or pasture packages?
38. Can I use slapt-get to mirror packages?
39. Is there a way to use tab completion for the package names in Bash?
40. How do I remove obsoleted packages?
41. What provisions have you made for dialup users?
42. Is there a way to get a report with the pending updates emailed to me?
43. What if I don't trust third party sources for upgrades?
44. How do I specify an addon thats not a dependency of my package?
45. Will slapt-get break my system?
46. What is a meta package and how can I take advantage of it?
47. How can I downgrade a package?
48. How can I search the contents of a package for a file or library?



1.  What is slapt-get ?

 slapt-get is an APT like system for Slackware package management. It allows
 one to search slackware.com and mirrors for packages, compare them with
 installed packages, install new packages or upgrade installed packages all
 with a few simple commands. Great for scripting as well.

 slapt-get is not affiliated or endorsed by Patrick Volkerding / slackware.com.


2.  Why yet another package management tool for slackware?

 To scratch and itch of mine, which also scratched an itch of a friend.  I
 created it originally without looking for an existing solution.  I now
 understand Slackware already has existing utilities that provide similar
 functionality.  I believe slapt-get to be superior because of its speed and
 simplicity.  I do not believe slapt-get takes away anything from these
 existing tools, slapt-get can stand on its own merits.  In the end, choice
 is great for the end users (just as in the desktop enviroment category).  
 Regardless, I do not aim for inclusion within Slackware.  I only want to make
 this availabe in hopes that others will find it useful.
 

3.  How do I build/install slapt-get?  How do I remove slapt-get?

 Two ways to install:

  A: You can build slapt-get from source and use the 'install' make target,
 
  B: You can build from source and make a Slackware package with the 'pkg'
     make target.  Then install the generated package within the newly created
     'pkg' directory.

 If you installed via `make install`, there is an 'uninstall' make target.

 If you installed the slack package, then use removepkg.


4.  How do I find a package I want to install?

 You can use the --search feature, supplying an expression.  POSIX 
 and extended regular expressions are supported.  This searches the name,
 location, or descriptions of packages.


5.  Can I upgrade all my installed packages?

 Yes, use the --upgrade option.  slapt-get will check for 
 newer versions of all packages already installed.

 Please review the Slackware ChangeLog.txt for the Slackware release you are
 running.  This is especially important for -current.


6.  How can I see what will be upgraded without upgrading?

 If the transaction report is not enough, use the --simulate option before
 --upgrade.  See slapt-get --help


7.  What if I only want to download the updates?

 Use the --download-only option before --upgrade.
 See slapt-get --help


8.  How can I re-install an existing package?

 Use the --reinstall option with --install pkg_name.
 See slapt-get --help


9.  Can I "dist-upgrade" to a newer Slackware release?

 Yes.

 Change your source location within /etc/slapt-get/slapt-getrc to point to
 the newer release directory.  --update your local package cache, then
 --dist-upgrade to the newer release.  You will also want to disable any
 third party package sources while upgrading to a newer release so you do
 not mix and match packages.

 For instance, you have the following uncommented line as your source:

   SOURCE=ftp://distro.ibiblio.org/pub/Linux/distributions/slackware/slackware-9.0/

 Simply change the url to point to current, like so:

   SOURCE=ftp://distro.ibiblio.org/pub/Linux/distributions/slackware/slackware-current/

 CAVEAT: The simplicity of slapt-get means a lot of assurances are not in
         place.  You can break a working system if you do not follow the
         suggestions in UPGRADE.TXT.

 Now you --dist-upgrade to retrieve the package data for that release.
 What dist-upgrade does is basically make sure that any missing packages
 from the base disk set are installed, as well as upgrade to any newer
 versions of the currently installed packages.  All of this happens in
 one transaction.

 dist-upgrade'ing involves doing the following:

   ### upgrade your local package cache
   $ slapt-get --update

   ### first, upgrade the most important
   #(this installs any newer versions)
   $ slapt-get --install glibc-solibs pkgtools sed

   ### then, let slapt-get upgrade the rest
   $ slapt-get --dist-upgrade

 Then follow the rest of the directions in UPGRADE.TXT.

   * Note: you might be able to get away with just doing a --dist-upgrade after
     the --update.  The second step above is made as a suggestion to follow
     the suggestions and conventions in UPGRADE.TXT.

 You should make sure any new packages within the disk sets you are using are
 also installed, as they will not be detected during --dist-upgrade.  Only 
 packages already installed will be upgraded.  To accomplish this, you can
 specify slapt-get to install a disk set like so:

   ### install all gnome and X packages
   $ slapt-get --search './slackware/gnome|./slackware/x'|awk '{print $1}'| \
     xargs -r slapt-get --install

 Do the same for all your installed disk sets, such as gnome, x, xap, l, n, etc.



10.  What about package dependencies?

 Other tools try to provide dependency checking via various hacks (generating
 the dependency file, exploding the package (or even worse, installed the
 package first just to find a broken dependency!), then ldd'ing binary files to
 find missing libraries before consulting the dependency file).  This is not a
 reliable/fool proof method.  It is also extremeley slow.  Dependencies can not
 always be defined strictly by library dependencies.  Applications, rather than
 libraries may be required, such as the case with man and groff.  Also, there is
 no ability to specify specific versions of a dependency.  

 I believe that package dependency support can be implemented in a Slackware 
 compatible way.  If we look to the existing infrastructure Pat has created
 for inspiration, we come to the simple addition of another file within the
 packages ./install directory.  Let's call it slack-required.  This information
 could be as simple as what rules existed in the autoconf scripts of the 
 upstream source.

 This file has a simple structure.  See FAQ # 19 for an example on the
 structure of an example slack-required file.

 slapt-get can resolve dependencies via the slack-required meta data.  Already
 there are packages being submitting to linuxpackages.net supporting this
 optional metadata.

 I have made sure that this information does not impact the ability of packages
 to be installed by the existing Slackware package tools.  This information
 now simply becomes an additional extension, easily bypassed or simply ignored.

 The information within slack-required can be added to the PACKAGES.TXT file.
 Scripts that generate mindful PACKAGES.TXT files are available, such as the
 one in this FAQ, see #17.

 So the package's entry within PACKAGES.TXT would go from:

   PACKAGE NAME:  man-1.5l-i386-1.tgz
   PACKAGE LOCATION:  ./slackware/ap
   PACKAGE SIZE (compressed):  166 K
   PACKAGE SIZE (uncompressed):  390 K
   PACKAGE DESCRIPTION:
   man: man (format and display the on-line manual pages)

 to this (note only an additional line per package entry):

   PACKAGE NAME:  man-1.5l-i386-1.tgz
   PACKAGE LOCATION:  ./slackware/ap
   PACKAGE SIZE (compressed):  166 K
   PACKAGE SIZE (uncompressed):  390 K
   PACKAGE REQUIRES: groff,man-pages
   PACKAGE DESCRIPTION:
   man: man (format and display the on-line manual pages)

 Since dependency information is known when the package is created, that is
 the best time/place to make that data available.  It is a simple progression
 from making a note within the package description such as the one already
 within the man package:

   man: man (format and display the on-line manual pages)
   man:
   man: The man package is a collection of tools used for searching and
   man: reading the online system documentation.  In fact, on most UNIX-like
   man: operating systems it is the primary means of finding out how programs
   man: on the system work.  For example, 'man man' will display the
   man: documentation for man itself.
   man:
   man: *-->*Man requires the groff text processing package.*<--*
   man:

 to providing that data in a way that can be scripted for those who have
 the advanced knowledge or want to provide higher level tools for Slackware.

 I hope if the community as a whole agrees that this is an added benefit 
 (without becoming overly complex or kludgey) they can convince Pat there is
 a need/demand for it.



11. What about multiple package sources, ala linuxpackages.net?

 You can use multiple sources with slapt-get (including linuxpackages.net).
 See the example slapt-getrc in the source tarball, or look in
 /etc/slapt-get/slapt-getrc.new if you installed via slackpack. See also
 README.


12. How can I get more detailed statistics for downloads?

 If you would like more notification on downloading pkgs/files, use the 
 command line option --show-stats (or -S).  This will show curl style
 download information.


13. How can I install every available package?

 Even though it is not built in, it is simple since slapt-get is easy to script
 with.  Here is a shell command to install every package that is available
 but not currently installed:

   slapt-get --list|grep inst=no|awk '{print $1}'|sort|uniq|xargs -r slapt-get --install


14. What if I only want to upgrade one package?

 Then you follow the debian apt-get method of using --install.
 If the package is already installed, it will check and install any newer
 versions:

 slapt-get --install {pkg_name}


15. What about Dropline support?

 There is no direct support for dropline packages.  If you do not want them
 upgraded, either put the package names or regex into the exception list.

 You can use the following for a dropline exclude (from example slapt-getrc):
 
  EXCLUDE=kernel-ide,kernel-source,kernel-headers,kernel-modules,lilo,.*-[0-9]dl$,devs


16. How can I generate an exclude list for an entire disk set?

 You can use this script to generate a listing of packages to add to your
 exlude list:

   #!/bin/sh
   # this should gen an exclude list for a particular dir set (first arg to script)
   DIR=$1
   slapt-get --search "^\.\/slackware\/${DIR}$"|awk '{print $1}'|\
    xargs -iZ echo -n "Z,"|sed -e 's/,$//'


17. How do I use a local file source?

 Within slapt-getrc, change your SOURCE= lines to point to file:// url's.

 For example, you could have an official and a local source like:
 SOURCE=ftp://ftp.slackware.no/pub/linux/slackware/slackware-9.1/
 SOURCE=file:///usr/src/local_pkg_repository/

 This local directory must have the PACKAGES.TXT and CHECKSUMS.md5 files
 present.  This could be a mounted Slackware release CDROM, or a custom
 repository.

 The CHECKSUMS.md5 file can be generated with find:
  rm CHECKSUMS.md5; find . -name '*.tgz' -exec md5sum {} >> CHECKSUMS.MD5 \;

 The PACKAGES.TXT can be generated by the following script:

 ### BEGIN SCRIPT
    #!/bin/sh

    function gen_packages_txt {
	    echo '' > PACKAGES.TXT
	    find . -type f -name '*.meta' -exec cat {} \; >> PACKAGES.TXT
    }

    function gen_md5_checksums {
	    echo '' > CHECKSUMS.md5
	    find . -type f -name '*.tgz' -exec md5sum {} \; >> CHECKSUMS.md5
    }

    function gen_meta {
	    if [ ! -f $1 ]; then
		    echo "File not found: $1"
		    exit 1;
	    fi
			if [ "`echo $1|grep -E '(.*{1,})\-(.*[\.\-].*[\.\-].*).tgz[ ]{0,}$'`" == "" ]; then
				return;
			fi
	    NAME=$(echo $1|sed -re "s/(.*\/)(.*.tgz)$/\2/")
	    LOCATION=$(echo $1|sed -re "s/(.*)\/(.*.tgz)$/\1/")
	    SIZE=$( expr `gunzip -l $1 |tail -1|awk '{print $1}'` / 1024 )
	    USIZE=$( expr `gunzip -l $1 |tail -1|awk '{print $2}'` / 1024 )
	    REQUIRED=$(tar xzf $1 install/slack-required -O 2>/dev/null|xargs -r -iZ echo -n "Z,"|sed -e "s/,$//")
	    CONFLICTS=$(tar xzf $1 install/slack-conflicts -O 2>/dev/null|xargs -r -iZ echo -n "Z,"|sed -e "s/,$//")
	    SUGGESTS=$(tar xzf $1 install/slack-suggests -O 2>/dev/null|xargs -r )
	    METAFILE=${NAME%tgz}meta
	    echo "PACKAGE NAME:  $NAME" > $LOCATION/$METAFILE
	    echo "PACKAGE LOCATION:  $LOCATION" >> $LOCATION/$METAFILE
	    echo "PACKAGE SIZE (compressed):  $SIZE K" >> $LOCATION/$METAFILE
	    echo "PACKAGE SIZE (uncompressed):  $USIZE K" >> $LOCATION/$METAFILE
	    echo "PACKAGE REQUIRED:  $REQUIRED" >> $LOCATION/$METAFILE
	    echo "PACKAGE CONFLICTS:  $CONFLICTS" >> $LOCATION/$METAFILE
	    echo "PACKAGE SUGGESTS:  $SUGGESTS" >> $LOCATION/$METAFILE
	    echo "PACKAGE DESCRIPTION:" >> $LOCATION/$METAFILE
	    tar xzf $1 install/slack-desc -O|grep -E '\w+\:'|grep -v '^#' >> $LOCATION/$METAFILE
	    echo "" >> $LOCATION/$METAFILE
    }

    case "$1" in
	    pkg)
		    if [ -n "$2" ]; then
			    gen_meta $2
		    else
			    echo "$0 [pkg [file]|all|new|PACKAGESTXT|MD5]"
		    fi
	    ;;
	    all)
		    for pkg in `find . -type f -name '*.tgz' -print`
		    do
			    gen_meta $pkg
		    done
		    $0 PACKAGESTXT
		    $0 MD5
	    ;;
	    new)
		    for pkg in `find . -type f -name '*.tgz' -print`
		    do
			    if [ ! -f ${pkg%tgz}meta ]; then
				    gen_meta $pkg
			    fi
		    done
	    ;;
	    PACKAGESTXT)
		    gen_packages_txt
	    ;;
	    MD5)
		    gen_md5_checksums
	    ;;
	    *)
		    echo "$0 [pkg [file]|all|new|PACKAGESTXT|MD5]"
	    ;;
    esac
 ### END SCRIPT


18. How can I download every package in a disk set?

 You can search the package location field, which specifies which directory
 the package resides in, on the mirror.

 Most mirrors use ./slackware/{disk set} as the directory for the set.  Thus
 to install every package from xap:

   slapt-get --search '^\.\/slackware\/xap$'|awk '{print $1}'| \
     xargs -r slapt-get --install


19. How can I add dependency information to my packages?

 This is for package developers.  If you are not a package developer, please
 request your packager include this information.

 To export the dependency data for a package, include within your package the
 following file:

   ./install/slack-required

 The structure of this file is one entry per line in the following format:

    package_name

 or
    [package_name] [condition] [version]

 where [condition] is

    =, >=, =<, <, or >

 <= and =< should both work, just in case of editing errors.

 Version should include the arch and build if using '='.  That is the full
 slackware package version designation.  1.1.0-386-1 is valid.  1.1.0 is not.

 You can specify multiple packages to satisfy a dependency.  The alternate
 packages are seperated by a pipe, |.

    jre = 1.4.1-i586-1 | j2sdk >= 1.4.2-i386-1 | jdk > 1.5.0-i386-1

 The package names are case sensitive.  So make sure you keep the case of the
 package name as it appears in the package filename.

 An example slack-required file is present within the slapt-get slack package.

 This data will then need to be extracted when the mirror's PACKAGES.TXT file
 is generated.  See FAQ #17 for an example of how to generate the
 PACKAGES.TXT file.  The following is an example entry:

    PACKAGE NAME:  man-pages-1.56-noarch-1.tgz
    ...(snip)
    PACKAGE REQUIRED:  man >= 1.5l-i386-1

 An example command to pull that data:
   tar xzf pkg-name-version-arch-rel.tgz install/slack-required -O|xargs -iZ echo -n "Z,"|sed -e "s/,$//"


20. How do I get the newest development version of slapt-get?

 See the 'Using cvs' section of the INSTALL document.


21. How can I contribute my ideas or code?

 Send in ideas or patches to the development list:

   slapt-get-devel at software dot jaos dot org

 The user list can be used for questions on slapt-get usage, etc:

   slapt-get-user at software dot jaos dot org


22. How can I get slapt-get to speak in my native tongue?

 Translations are needed.  GNU gettext is used to extract all translatable strings
 from the source.  Please look in the po/ directory of the slapt-get source, or in
 /usr/share/slapt-get/locales.  Copy the slapt-get.pot file to a new files named
 with your native language abbreviation, ending in .po.  For example, to 
 translate to German,

 $ cp /usr/share/slapt-get/locales/slapt-get.pot /tmp/de.po

 Edit that file.  For every msgid, translate that into the msgstr "".  Leave the
 formatting the same.

 Email in your translation to the slapt-get-devel mailing list.  Your contributions
 are greatly appreciated.


23. How do I set the output language?

 You can change the locale at runtime by setting the LANG environment
 variable.

 $ LANG=fr slapt-get


24. How do I specify proxy settings?

 slapt-get takes advantage of the normal http_proxy and ftp_proxy shell
 variables. Here are some examples:

  # setting the env variables for the entire session
  $ export http_proxy=http://host:port
  $ export ftp_proxy=ftp://host:port
  # just setting them for the current command invocation
  $ http_proxy=http://host:port slapt-get --update

 If you are using ~/.netrc, libcurl automatically picks up your preferences.


25. How can I exclude all *pre*, *beta*, and *686* packages safely?

 An exclude regex like .*pre.* , .*beta.*, or .*686.* may net you the results
 of excluding all packages with those characters in the name or version.  But
 they may also catch packages that have those characters normally occuring in
 the package name.

 This regex seems to work much better:

   [0-9\_\.\-]{1}pre[0-9\-\.\-]{1}

 for beta packages:

   [0-9\_\.\-]{1}beta[0-9\-\.\-]{1}

 or for i686 packages (or for i585 or i486):

   [0-9\_\.\-]+i686

 Anything matching these regex will be added to the exclude list for the
 transaction.


26. How does the transaction engine work?

 The last few series of releases (0.9.6x and 0.9.7x) have supported
 transactions so that nothing happens unless everything checks out properly.
 The transaction is built up of packages to install, upgrade and remove.	The
 transaction status will be reported to the user to be confirmed (unless the
 user passes in --no-prompt on the command line).  After this confirmation, all
 packages will be downloaded before anything else happens.  If anything fails
 to download, the transaction is immediately aborted.	If all pacakges download
 successfully, all packages to be installed (new installs) are installed first.
 This should satisfy dependencies of the packages to be upgraded, which follow
 after the new installs.  Finally, and removals in the transaction are
 completed.  This helps keep your system in a consistant state, and should give
 you full control.


27. How does the package version comparison algorithm work?

 Say we have foo-1.1.3-i386-1rob and foo-1.1.3-i686-1.

 The version parts will be compared, first 1, then 1, then 3.  At this point,
 both packages are equal, since 1.1.3 == 1.1.3. If one is greater at this
 point, the version check returns.

 Then it checks to make sure that both pkgs have the same number of "version
 parts".  This is the case in this example, both have 3 (1,1,3).	This is useful
 when you see packages like 1.2 and 1.2.1. Whichever has more parts wins.  At
 this point, we know if one only has 2 parts, and the other has 3, then the
 first two parts of both version strings have to be equal.

 Then the package versions are checked to see if they follow the slackware
 convention.  This is determined by checking the first instance of '-' against
 the last instance.  If the pointer returned from index and rindex are
 different, then we assume we have at least two package version separators
 (meaning we should have an upstream version, arch, and build at least).

 If two separators are found, the build portion of the string is located.  The
 integer value of the build strings are compared.  So "1rob" has an integer
 value of 1, and "1" has an integer value of 1.  So in our example, both package
 versions are the same.

 If the only difference is the arch and the packages follow the conventions,
 then they should always be equal.

 If two separators are not found, then the entire version string from both pkgs
 are compared via strcmp.  This is a fallback mechanism.


28. I am tracking current, how do I keep the base disk set up to date?

 If you are tracking current, --dist-upgrade may be more useful than --upgrade.

 Even if you aren't intentionally switching to a newer distribution,
 --dist-upgrade will ensure that the base set is always present while at the
 same time keeping your installed packages up to date.


29. How would I script an ldd dependency hack with slapt-get?

 Do something like the following:

 ### begin script
 #!/bin/sh
 # slapt-get wrapper to hack dependencies via ldd where slack-required isn't available
 # Copyright (C) 11-30-2003 Jason Woodward 
 WORKINGDIR=`grep WORKINGDIR /etc/slapt-get/slapt-getrc|cut -f2 -d'='`
 MF=MANIFEST
 PKGLINES=${WORKINGDIR}/depslapt_pkgs
 DEPDATA=()
 DEPDATACOUNT=0
 
 function get_pkg_cache_data {
 	if [ -f ${MF} ]; then rm ${MF};fi
 	for url in `grep '^SOURCE' /etc/slapt-get/slapt-getrc|cut -f2 -d'='`
 	do
 		echo "retrieving data from $url"
 		if [ -f ${MF}.bz2 ]; then rm ${MF}.bz2;fi
 		wget -q ${url}/${MF}.bz2
 		if [ -f ${MF}.bz2 ]; then
 			bunzip2 -c ${MF}.bz2 >> ${MF}; rm ${MF}.bz2
 		else
 			wget -q ${url}/slackware/${MF}.bz2
 			if [ -f ${MF}.bz2 ]; then bunzip2 -c ${MF}.bz2 >> ${MF}; rm ${MF}.bz2; fi
 		fi
 	done
	if [ ! -f ${MF} ]; then echo "Failed to download MANIFEST"; exit 1; fi
 	echo "extracting package data"
 	grep -n ' Package\: ' ${MF}|awk '{print $1 $3}'|sed -re "s/\|//g" > ${PKGLINES}
 }
 
 function map_to_pkg {
 	LOOKUP=$1
 	LASTPKG=
 	for pkgline in `cat ${PKGLINES}|cut -f1 -d':'`
 	do
 		if [ $LOOKUP -gt $pkgline ]; then
 			false
 		else
 			LASTPKG=`grep -B 1 $pkgline ${PKGLINES} |head -1|cut -f2 -d':'`
 			return
 		fi
 	done
 	### clear it in case we get here
 	LASTPKG=
 }
 
 function lookup_lib {
 	for linenumber in `grep -n $1 /var/slapt-get/${MF}|cut -f1 -d':'`
 	do
 		map_to_pkg $linenumber
 		if [ -n "$LASTPKG" ]; then
 			DEPS[$DEPCOUNT]=`basename $LASTPKG|sed -re "s/(.*{1,})\\-(.*[\\.\\-].*[\\.\\-].*).tgz[ ]{0,}$/\1/"`
 			DEPCOUNT=$((DEPCOUNT + 1))
 		fi
 	done
 }
 
 function resolve_dependencies {
 	DEPS=()
 	DEPCOUNT=0
 	for pkg in "$@"
 	do
 		INST=`ls /var/log/packages/|grep ${pkg}|sort -rn|head -1`
 		FILES="`cat /var/log/packages/$INST|grep 'bin\/'|grep -v '\/$'`"
 		for file in $FILES
 		do
 			MISSINGLIBS=`ldd /${file}|grep -i 'not found'|awk '{print $1}'|sort|uniq`
 			for lib in $MISSINGLIBS
 			do
 				echo "Missing lib: $lib"
 				lookup_lib $lib
 			done
 		done
 	done
 	### recurse
 	if [ $DEPCOUNT -gt 0 ]; then
 		slapt-get --install ${DEPS[*]} || exit
 		resolve_dependencies ${DEPS[*]}
 	fi
 }
 
 # give usage if no arguments
 if [ -z "$1" ]; then echo "Usage: $0 [--update|packages]"; exit; fi
 # get package cache data if it is not already there, or we want it
 cd ${WORKINGDIR}
 if [ "$1" == "--update" ]; then get_pkg_cache_data; exit; fi
 if [ ! -f ${PKGLINES} ]; then get_pkg_cache_data; fi
 # read pkg data into memory 
 while read line;do DEPDATA[${DEPDATACOUNT}]=$line; DEPDATACOUNT=$((DEPDATACOUNT + 1)); done < ${PKGLINES}
 # install with slapt-get, then call the resolve_dependencies
 slapt-get $SLAPT_OPTS --install "$@" || exit
 resolve_dependencies $@
 ### end script


30. Does EXCLUDE work for install as well as upgrade and dist-upgrade?

 No, EXCLUDE is only consulted for upgrading and dist-upgrading.  If you
 specify the package name as an argument to --install, slapt-get will 
 ignore the EXCLUDE list.

 This does not apply to dependencies.  If a dependency of a specified package
 is detected, it is checked against the EXCLUDE list.  If excluded, the 
 dependency check for the specified package fails.  Override this with --no-dep.


31. What about package conflicts?  How can I specify a conflict for my package?

 Package conflicts are not as common as dependencies, but just as crucial.
 Packages such as lprng and cups sometimes duplicate the same functionality and 
 must not be installed side by side.

 To address this, include within your package ./install/slack-conflicts.  This
 file has the same syntax as the slack-required file, just without the version
 information.

 The following is a fictitious example of a lprng slack-conflicts file:

 # cat ./install/slack-conflicts
   gnome-cups-manager
   libgnomecups
   cups
 #

 In this example, we want to specify that the gnome-cups-manager, cups, and
 libgnomecups packages are in direct conflict with lprng.

 Conflicts will exclude a package during --upgrade or --dist-upgrade.  If the
 package specified to install is conflicted, the user is prompted to remove
 the conflict and install the requested package.


32. Is the ROOT environment variable honored for install and upgrading?

 Yes, if you have been using ROOT with installpkg and upgradepkg, slapt-get
 will modify where it looks for the package logs based on this environment
 variable.

 For example export ROOT=/home/keary/newroot would make slapt-get look in
 /home/keary/newroot/var/log/packages for installed package information and
 install all upgraded/new packages in /home/keary/newroot instead of /


33. How do I specify the exact version of a package to install?

 Specify the version along with the package name with the --install argument.

 For example, to install pkgtools version 9.0.0-i386-1, use 'pkgtools-9.0.0-i386-1'
 as the --install argument.


34. Why is upgradepkg complaining it cannot find installpkg or removepkg, with sudo?

 Right from the sudo man page's Security Notes section:

  "Note, however, that the actual PATH environment variable is not modified and
   is passed unchanged to the program that sudo executes."

 Make sure you include /sbin in your shell's PATH environment variable before using
 slapt-get via sudo.  Or use su - -c 'slapt-get [options] [arg]s'.


35. How can I specify a username/password for the connection to the package source?

 This can be specified right in the package source url within the
 /etc/slapt-get/slapt-getrc.  You will want to make sure that sensitive
 passwords are protected, and possibly harden the permissions on
 /etc/slapt-get/slapt-getrc so that only the root user can read the file.

 Examples:

  SOURCE=http://user:pass@host.org/path/to/packages/
  SOURCE=ftp://user:pass@host.org/pub/packages/


36. /var/slapt-get is growing large, how can I safely free up space?

 Use the --clean option to remove all the cached packages from the tree within
 /var/slapt-get.

 Or use --autoclean, which is like clean but clears out the local repository of
 retrieved package files that can no longer be downloaded, and are largely
 useless. This allows a cache to be maintained over a long period without 
 it growing out of control.


37. What about extra, testing, or pasture packages?

 Example source entries for the extra, testing, and pasture packages sets can be
 found within the example.slapt-getrc file under /usr/doc/slapt-get*/.


38. Can I use slapt-get to mirror packages?

 Yes, you can use it to mirror packages by using the following:

  slapt-get --list|awk '{print $1}'|xargs -r slapt-get --download-only \
		--reinstall --install

 The packages whill then be mirrored under ${ROOT}/var/slapt-get in the
 directory structure they where found in.  You can then generate the 
 PACKAGES.TXT and CHECKSUMS.md5 files using the script in FAQ #17 which would
 allow you to use this mirror as a slapt-get source.


39. Is there a way to use tab completion for the package names in Bash?

 Yes, this completion was contributed by Alec Thomas on the slapt-get-devel
 mailing list.  This goes in your ~/.bashrc file (or in /etc/bash_completion,
 /etc/bash_completion.d/, /etc/profile, or /etc/profile.d/):

  complete_slaptget()
  {
	  cur=${COMP_WORDS[COMP_CWORD]}
	  if [ "${COMP_WORDS[$[$COMP_CWORD-1]]}" = "--remove" ]; then
		  COMPREPLY=( $( cd /var/log/packages; ls "$cur"* 2> /dev/null | sed -e 's/-[^-]*-[^-]*-[^-]*$//') )
	  else
		  COMPREPLY=( $( slapt-get --search "^$cur" 2> /dev/null | awk '{print $1}' ) )
	  fi
  }
  complete -F complete_slaptget -o default slapt-get


40. How do I remove obsoleted packages?

 If you are tracking current or are dist-upgrading to a new release, you will
 encounter packages that you have installed that are no longer required or
 part of the basic slackware install.  If you only have the official slackware
 package sources in your slapt-getrc file, then you can use the following
 as either a command or a script to remove those obsoleted packages:

  for pkg in `slapt-get --installed|awk '{print $1}'`;do if [ -z "`slapt-get --search ${pkg}`" ]; then slapt-get --remove ${pkg};fi;done

 or as a script:

  #!/bin/sh
  # this script uses slapt-get to remove obsoleted packages
  # slapt-getrc must only have official package sources for the
  # current release you are tracking
  for pkg in `./slapt-get --installed|awk '{print $1}'`
  do
	  if [ -z "`./slapt-get --search ${pkg}`" ]
	  then
		  echo ./slapt-get --remove ${pkg}
	  fi
  done



41. What provisions have you made for dialup users?

 Measurements to save bandwidth have been taken.

  * Incomplete package downloads will resume from where they left off.
  * The package data download (via --update) will only download those sources
    that have changed since the last download.
  * The transaction report gives accurate statistics about sizes required to
    download, as well as how much additional space will be required after
    unpacking the package archives.  This report will also indicate how
    much is left to resume if the download was previously interrupted.


42. Is there a way to get a report with the pending updates emailed to me?

 Yes, you may use these scripts to send notification via email any time updates
 are available:

 http://www.nerdworks.org/download/scripts/update-notifier/
 http://www.atozcomp.com/slapt_update


43. What if I don't trust third party sources for upgrades?

 You can use different slapt-getrc files.  For example:

  slapt-get --config /etc/slapt-get/slapt-getrc.official --update && \
  slapt-get --dist-upgrade

 You will have to run --update every time you change your config file.  Also,
 if your excludes and working directory are different in each file, you will
 want to specify --config with each invocation of slapt-get to ensure that file
 is parsed.


44. How do I specify an addon thats not a dependency of my package?

 You can include a slack-suggests file within your package's ./install/ directory.
 The format of this file follows the slack-required, except version information
 is to be left out.  This version information is useless as you are just making
 a suggestion, not a requirement.  If there is a required version of a package
 you can either specify it within ./install/slack-required or include it within
 the documentation inside of your package.

 The suggestion information is presented during the transaction report or via the
 --show pkg-name query.


45. Will slapt-get break my system?

 slapt-get is a frontend to pkgtools.  As such you have the same ability to
 break a working system using slapt-get as you do using upgradepkg without
 caution.  A few points are in order:

 * slapt-get will not make assumptions or do things without you telling it to,
   ie: installing, removing, or upgrading packages
 * untested updates are risky, whether using official packages or third party
   packages.
 * slapt-get will not change your system such that you can only use slapt-get
   or are somehow locked into using slapt-get.  The only additions to your
   system are /etc/slapt-get and /var/slapt-get.  You are free to try another
   solution or go back to manual upgradepkg.
 * UPGRADE.TXT and ChangeLog.txt are still required reading for upgrades or
   running -current.


46. What is a meta package and how can I take advantage of it?

 A meta package is a package that only contains it's dependencies in the
 slack-required file.  There is nothing in the package to install, it just
 provides a name and a dependency list.  A good example would be GNOME.  If a
 "gnome" meta package existed that required the gtk libraries and gnome
 applications, your user could install the gnome meta package without having to
 know all of the packages that go along with it.  This is a good application of
 dependencies and suggestions.

 When rolling out a new version of your application suite (gnome in our example),
 you can increment the version of the meta package and change the included packages
 and their required versions.  That way you can roll out a 2.x release update, but
 provide an easy way to roll back to a previous 1.x release of the entire application
 suite.


47. How can I downgrade a package?

 You can downgrade a package by specifying the version of the package when using
 --install.  You will also need to provide --reinstall.  For example:

  # slapt-get --search rsync
  rsync 2.5.6-i386-1 [inst=no]: rsync
  rsync 2.6.2-i386-1 [inst=yes]: rsync

  # slapt-get --install rsync-2.5.6-i386-1 --reinstall
  Reading Package Lists... Done
  The following packages will be upgraded:
    rsync
  1 upgraded, 0 newly installed, 0 to remove and 0 not upgraded.
  Need to get 121K of archives.
  After unpacking 30K disk space will be freed.
  Do you want to continue? [y/N]


48. How can I search the contents of a package for a file or library?

 Slapt-get does not pay attention to the contents of packages.  Slackware
 provides the MANIFEST.bz2 and the contents of /var/log/packages for such
 functionality.  Searching for which installed package owns a file is
 accomplished the easiest by using grep with the contents of
 /var/log/packages/.

 The same can be done with the MANIFEST.bz2 file.  You can use one of the 
 following solutions:

 Put something like this in your shell's rc file (or /etc/profile) would do
 just as well:

  # begin
  function search_manifest {
    LASTPKG=

    if [ -z "$1" ]; then return;fi

    if [ -z "$MANIFEST" ]; then
  	  echo "Please set MANIFEST env variable to point to a downloaded MANIFEST.bz2"
  	  return
    fi

    if [ ! -f ${MANIFEST/MANIFEST.bz2/package_list} ]; then
  	  bzgrep -n ' Package\: ' ${MANIFEST}|awk '{print $1 $3}'|sed -re "s/\|//g" >
      ${MANIFEST/MANIFEST.bz2/package_list}
    fi

    FILE=$( echo $1 | sed -re "s/^\///");
    LOOKUP=$(bzgrep -n $FILE $MANIFEST|cut -f1 -d':')

    if [ -z "$LOOKUP" ]; then
  	  echo "$1 not found in $MANIFEST"
  	  return
    fi

     for pkgline in `cat ${MANIFEST/MANIFEST.bz2/package_list}|cut -f1 -d':'`
     do

   	  if [ $LOOKUP -gt $pkgline ]; then
   		  false
   	  else
   		  LASTPKG=`grep -B 1 $pkgline ${MANIFEST/MANIFEST.bz2/package_list}|head -1 \
  				|cut -f2 -d':'|cut -f3 -d'/'`
  		  echo $LASTPKG $1
   		  return
   	  fi

     done
  }
  #end

  Then you'd just call from your shell search_manifest /usr/lib/libpci.a:
  pciutils-2.1.11-i486-5.tgz /usr/lib/libpci.a

 Or you can use this solution provided by Nathan Morell <frizop at eatel.net>:

  #!/usr/bin/perl
  use strict;
  use warnings;
  use PerlIO::gzip;

  open FOO, "<:gzip", "/home/jidar/MANIFEST.gz" or die $!;

  my $temp;
  while (){ # And it will be uncompressed...
      if ($_ =~ m/\|\|   Package:  /g) {
          $_ =~ s/\|\|   Package:  /PACKAGE: /g;
          $temp = $_;
      }
      if ($_ =~ m/($ARGV[0])/g) {
          print $temp . $_;
      }
  }